The "Value Meal" Bundle

By Christie Walker
The story of Goofus and Gallant in this issue of LabTalk was a fun way to illustrate best practices for dispensing eye wear. The problem for labs, however, is and has always been how to get your clients to use these best practices in their office. When I first entered the eye wear industry twelve years ago, Joe Bruneni was banging the drum for making eye wear recommendations from the chair, handing out prescriptions with specific recommendations for AR, sunglasses and lens material, and explaining to patients why they needed these products. Here it is 2009, and the problems are the same—doctors are NOT making recommendations from the chair, and they’re NOT handing out multiple prescriptions. So what’s a lab to do?

Aside from holding a gun to the doctor’s head, I don’t think you’re going to be able to change the way doctors conduct their exam. So for the time being, let’s bypass the doctor and move straight to the dispensary. Labs have become the ipso facto educators of dispensary staff.

Understanding that it’s easier to sell two pair of glasses to someone already sitting in front of you than to drum up new patients, labs have been promoting the concept of the second pair sale for as long as I can remember. Everyone needs a pair of sunglasses. Most people could use a pair of computer glasses, and with a little probing, dispensers might find a few patients who need prescription goggles for skiing or snorkeling.

One way labs can make the job of the dispenser easier is to offer product bundles—a Sun and Sports package; an Office or Task package; and a Kids or Safety package. Consumers understand packages. McDonalds calls its package deal a Value Meal; Taco Bell…a Meal Deal. By bundling the hamburger, French fries and drink together, you receive more for less. People get that. Car dealers do the same thing.

It’s a package of products that when bundled together gives the customer everything they need, at a lower cost than buying the items a la cart.

As a lab, you can create your own “Value Meal” menu items and send the “menu” to your customers. Think of the Staples commercial with the “Easy Button.” This is the optical equivalent of an “easy button.”

On page 18 you will find a tear out of Recommended Lens Packages, which we have published before. Cut this out, make copies, and distribute to your clients. But this time, take it one step further by creating a specific “value meal” complete with prices. Depending on which products you support/offer, make up a “menu” with bundled products with a price for the bundle. For example, an Office “Value Meal” might consist of a pair of Shamir Office lenses, made in polycarbonate with an AR coating. The price should be less than the sum of the individual parts for it to be a true “Value Meal.”

Bundling can also be created around the “good, better, best” model. With the different levels of AR coatings now available, many labs can offer a “good, better, best” choice when it comes to AR. In this scenario, every level—good, better and best—comes with AR. Dispensers only offer the three packages and every level comes with some type of AR. The Best is presented first along with the price. If the customer passes out from sticker shock, the “better” package is offered. If that still doesn’t fly, then the “good” package is offered, which still comes with an AR coating. This way everyone leaves the office with an AR coating. The “good, better, best” model can also be applied to sunglasses. By taking the attitude that every patient needs a pair of polarized sunglasses—it’s only a matter of what type and what features, not a yes or a no—the sale of sunglasses will skyrocket.

As a lab, you can encourage this new sales tactic and make it easy for the dispensers by providing bundled lens packages complete with prices. By giving the patient different price choices on bundled packages, not a yes or no option, you’ll see second pair sales become a common occurrence, not a rarity.

Recommended Lens Packages

Everyday

Material: Based on the prescription and mounting requirements for your lenses, your lens material will be:

Polycarbonate/Trivex—the safest material available to protect your eyes from injury due to lens impact.

Trivex—the best material for this type of rimless frame with screw or tension lens mountings.

High-Index— it’s lighter in weight to make your glasses feel more comfortable when you wear them.

No Reflections: Anti-reflective lenses reduce reflections making it easier to see. Sun Protection: Photochromic lenses darken and lighten automatically just when you need them.

Sport/Sun

Material: Based on your activity level your lens material will be:

Polycarbonate/Trivex—the safest material available to protect your eyes from injury due to lens impact.

Sun Protection: Polarized lenses block blinding glare, allowing you to see more clearly.

No Reflections: A backside anti-reflective coating on your sunglasses will eliminate the reflections of your eyes in the lenses, making it easier to see.

Kids/Safety

Material: Polycarbonate/Trivex—the safest material available to protect your children’s eyes from injury due to lens impact.

Special lens materials are recommended for specific occupational tasks.

No Reflections: Anti-reflective lenses reduce reflections making it easier to see.

Sun Protection: Photochromic lenses darken and lighten automatically just when you need them. Great for kids who might loose a second pair of sunglasses.

Office/Task

Design: Specific lenses designed for tasks such as working at a computer, under a car, or during prolonged detail tasks such as model building or needle work.

Material: Polycarbonate/Trivex—the safest material available to protect your eyes from injury due to lens impact.

Special lens materials are recommended for specific occupational tasks.

No Reflections: Anti-reflective lenses reduce reflections making it easier to see.

CURRENT ISSUE


May/June LabTalk 2017